Environmental Policy and Planning Faculty Profiles

Professor

Arun Agrawal is a Professor at the School of Natural Resources & Environment at the University of Michigan. His research and teaching emphasize the politics of international development, institutional change, and environmental conservation. He has written critically on indigenous knowledge, community-based conservation, common property, population and resources, and environmental identities. His recent interests include adaptation to climate change, urban adaptation, REDD+, and the decentralization of environmental governance.

Professor

Rosina’s research interests lie at the interface of science and policy--principally on issues related to climate change adaptation and mitigation at the national and international levels.  She teaches courses on Climate Policy.  She has been named the new Chair of the Global Environment Facility’s Science and Technical Advisory Panel, and serves on President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST).  Rosina is an Adaptation Fellow at the World Bank, leads the Adaptation Chapter for the Congressionally-mandated U.S. National Climate assessment, and is review editor for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. She serves on the Boards of several Foundations and NGOs and has lectured on every continent. Bierbaum served in both the executive and legislative branches of Government for two decades--as the Senate-confirmed director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Environment Division, and in multiple capacities at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment.  Rosina was Dean of SNRE from 2001-2011, during which time she oversaw the creation of a new undergraduate Program in the Environment, five new dual Master’s degrees across campus, and tripled interdisciplinary research in the School.

Associate Professor

We face diminishing material and energy abundance while we address the climate disruption caused by our past consumption. This bio-physical reality is inevitable. What is not inevitable, however, is the nature of our response. Yet so often we are faced with, not reasonable, but infuriatingly unreasonable behavior. Why is this and what can we do to help people become positively engaged?  In short, how can we bring out the best in people despite their facing difficult and irreversible environmental circumstances?

Professor of Practice

My teaching and advising interests address energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from transportation as well as broader aspects of sustainable mobility and energy use. A main interest is the "cars vs. climate" problem, which I address in a holistic manner that examines the technolgical, economic, behavioral and policy factors that shape oil demand and GHG emissions from motor vehicles and fuels that power them. Such understanding is crucial as society seeks globally viable solutions for sustainable transportation. 

Associate Professor

Professor Hardin teaches courses in both SNRE and the Department of Anthropology. Her areas of interest and scientific study include human/wildlife interactions, and social and environmental change related to tourism, logging, conservation and hunting in the forests of Central Africa. Recent projects focus on the increasingly intertwined practices of health and environmental management in southern and eastern Africa. She also studies historical and ethnographic aspects of concessionary politics involving corporations, NGOs, and local communities, particularly in Africa.

Professor and Director of the Erb Institute

Andy Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise; a position that holds joint appointments at the School of Natural Resources & Environment and the Ross School of Business. He also serves as Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise.  His research focuses on corporate strategies that address environmental and social issues.  His disciplinary background lies in the areas of organizational behavior, institutional change, negotiations and change management.  He has published more than 90 articles nine books, two of which have been translated into five different languages. Prior to academics, he worked for the US Environmental Protection Agency, Metcalf & Eddy, the Amoco Corporation, and T&T Construction and Design, Inc. In 2004, he was a Senior Fellow with the Meridian Institute.

Teaching interests include competitive environmental strategy, strategies for sustainable development, organizational behavior, negotiations, green construction, and organizational change

Professor and Director, Center for Sustainable Systems

Dr. Keoleian co-founded and serves as director of the Center for Sustainable Systems. His research focuses on the development and application of life cycle models and metrics to enhance the sustainability of products and technology. He has pioneered new methods in life cycle design, life cycle optimization of product replacement, life cycle cost analysis and life cycle based sustainability assessments ranging from energy analysis and carbon footprints to social indicators.

Professor

Research Interests:

My broad research interests are related to the human dimensions of global change and social studies of science. I am particularly interested in understanding: (a) the intersection between development and climate, especially concerning the relationship between anti-poverty programs and risk management (b) the use of technoscientific information, especially seasonal climate (El Nino forecasting) in building adaptive capacity to climate variability and change (drought planning, water management, and agriculture) in the U.S. (Great Lakes) and Latin America (Brazil, Mexico and Chile); (c) the impact of technocratic decisionmaking on issues of democracy and equity; (d) the co-production of science and policy and the role of technocrats as decisionmakers; (e) the role of popular participation in urban environmental policymaking and policymaker/client interactions; (f)U.S.-Mexico border region environmental policymaking especially regarding transboundary water conflict, environmental health, a common use of shared natural resources.

Professor

Teaching and research in evolutionary and behavioral ecology; resource control and reproductive success in vertebrates, including humans; integration of evolutionary theory and resource management; resources and reproductive variance; reproductive and resource tradeoffs for modern women.

Professor

Tom Lyon is the Dow Professor of Sustainable Science, Technology and Commerce. His research and teaching interests include environmental information disclosure and greenwash; corporate environmental strategy; environmental NGOs; voluntary environmental agreements; government regulation of business; industrial organization; and energy and the environment.

Assistant Professor

Robyn Meeks is an environmental and development economist. Currently, much of her work focuses on understanding individual and household behavioral responses to the introduction of various environmental technologies and infrastructure in developing countries. Dr. Meeks is an assistant professor with appointments in both the School of Natural Resources and Environment (SNRE) and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LSA). She teaches within the Environmental Policy and Planning field of study in SNRE and the Program in the Environment in LSA.

Professor

Teaching and research interests are focused on environmental justice, public opinion and the environment, and influences on environmental policy making. A founder of the Environmental Justice Program at the University of Michigan. Current research includes understanding the causes of disproportionate environmental burdens in people of color communities and the role that environmental factors play in accounting for racial and socioeconomic disparities in health.

Professor and Associate Dean for Research

Michael Moore's teaching involves courses in natural resource and environmental economics. His research interests include analysis of federal water policy and water allocation conflicts between environmental and consumptive uses of river systems; economic aspects of biodiversity and species conservation; and economics of environmental markets, including markets for green products (such as green electricity) and markets for pollution permits (such as the federal SO2 allowance market).

Professor

Joan Iverson Nassauer is Professor of Landscape Architecture in the School of Natural Resources and Environment. She was named Fellow by the American Society of Landscape Architects (1992), Fellow of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (2007), and Distinguished Practitioner of Landscape Ecology in the US (1998) and Distinguished Scholar (2007) by the International Association of Landscape Ecology. She focuses on the cultural sustainability of ecological design in human-dominated landscapes.  Her research offers knowledge and strategies for basing ecological design on cultural insight, strong science, and creative engagement with policy. Her teaching and recent projects apply this approach to brownfields, vacant property, exurban sprawl, and agricultural landscapes.

Associate Professor

Research focus: Issues of social and ecological sustainability with a primary focus on principles for sustainability, overconsumption and sufficiency, the language and ethics of resource use, localization and the transition out of fossil fuels.

Professor, Environmental Justice Field of Studies Coordinator, Past Chair of the Environment and Technology Section of the American Sociological Association

My research interests include urban agriculture, food access, and food insecurity; institutional diversity; green jobs; social movement analysis; environmental justice; leisure and natural resource use; poverty; and race, gender, and ethnic relations. My current research includes an assessment of food access in Michigan and other Midwestern states.  Other recent research activities have included an analysis of the green jobs sector, and four national studies of racial and gender diversity in the environmental field.

Associate Professor

Julia Wondolleck has spent over 20 years researching the emergence and functioning of inter-organizational and community-based collaborative processes in ecosystem-scale resource management, processes that often arise in response to natural and/or social system crises. Her research focus is environmental decision-making and the structure of policy and administrative processes that promote the sustainability of ecological and human systems in the face of diverse yet legitimate interests, scientific complexity, and often conflicting and ambiguous legal direction.

Professor

My research focuses on how political processes and organizations make environmental policy choices, and how new collaborative structures can be developed to encourage more effective decision making. I am particularly interested in landscape-scale conservation and sustainable natural resource management, and how decision making institutions can be encouraged to take on an ecosystem-scale perspective. Of particular interest is policy involving biological diversity, public lands and energy.