School of Natural Resources and Environment

Conservation Ecology News & Highlights

CILER summer fellowships

The Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research (CILER) announces the 2015 Great Lakes Summer Student Fellows Program. The Great Lakes Summer Fellows Program exposes students to a broad range of fields and provides an exciting opportunity for students to conduct research in the Great Lakes region under the mentorship of a researcher or working professional. This program is sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL), with additional positions funded through external grants at CILER. 

Michigan’s Renewable Portfolio Standard

The University of Michigan recently released a study analyzing the real impacts of raising Michigan’s Renewable Portfolio Standard - the policy mandating the percentage of the state’s electric generation capacity that must be provided by renewable power. The study, sponsored by the University of Michigan Energy Institute, analyzes several scenarios, detailing the changes to different power generation sources such as coal and natural gas, the environmental benefits to the state, and the associated costs under each.

Michigan Sea Grant is soliciting three types of projects for the next research funding cycle, from 2016-2018. For the past several cycles, MSG has focused on Integrated Assessment projects. The 2015 call for proposals, however, includes two new opportunities. Core research, a more traditional approach to research, and graduate student research fellowships have been added to this RFP.

Pre-proposals and proposals are sought for the following topics:

By Wufan Jia, Environmental Policy and Planning, Sustainable Systems

My first day at the COP meetings was so informational that I am forced to highlight only the most interesting points. I will talk about the meetings I attended and you may get a sense of what is going on here, and as I am more interested in China, I pay more attention to events about China today. 

Katie Browne, Environmental Justice

 

Here at the Conference of Parties in Lima, I have been struck by the odd mixture of rah-rah optimism and doomsday pessimism permeating the corridors and negotiating rooms. It is an odd disjuncture, especially for a first-timer to the COP process. While everyone acknowledges that the cost of failure to reach a climate deal next year in Paris is so high as to be almost inconceivable, the possibility for failure remains a lurking reality.

By Arman Golrokhian

This past weekend, I and Samantha Shattuck attended the COY10 (Conference of Youth) in Lima, Peru. COY is an annual event that gathers youth from all around the world to meet and exchange their knowledge and experiences about engaging their communities in better understanding, addressing, and adapting to adverse climate change issues at regional and global scales.

Charles Darwin noted more than 150 years ago that animals on the Galapagos Islands, including finches and marine iguanas, were more docile than mainland creatures. He attributed this tameness to the fact that there are fewer predators on remote islands.

While "island tameness" is an old idea, there have been few rigorous studies of the phenomenon. Many aspects remain unclear, including the mechanisms behind it and the speed at which it evolves in island populations.

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